• The People Look Like Flowers At Last

    The Tony Wilson Sextet was formed in 1990 in Vancouver, BC, to perform original compositions and arrangements by guitarist Tony Wilson. Since 1995 the ensemble’s personal has remained constant and consists of the musicians heard on this recording. This is the long awaited second release for the ensemble. Their debut cd ”Lowest Note” was released on Spool in 2001 and received great reviews and was one of the Globe and Mail picks for that year. read more...
  • Pearls Before Swine

    This debut release from the Tony Wilson 6Tet is the first documentation of the ongoing musical investigations this group started four years ago. Each composition explores various styles and sonic possibilities. Melancholy melodies, collective noise improvisations, metre shifts and African rhythms stand side by side and combine to give this ensemble a very different and original sound. References might be to artists such as Albert Ayler, Sonny Sharrock or Bill Frisell, but because of the individual approaches of each player, this band will remind you of no one else. The four cover tunes are Tony’s homages to the artists who have influenced him over the years. The original compositions range from intimate ballads to ostinato driven collective improvisations and include a guest vocal performance by folkster Kevin House. read more...
  • Lowest Note

    Lowest Note is Vancouver guitarist Tony Wilson's first CD as a leader. It fits the new jazz Vancouver sound developed in the 1990s by people like François Houle, Peggy Lee, and Dylan van der Schyff, all of whom appear on this CD. Actually, this sextet (plus Houle on track four) is pretty close to the Peggy Lee Ensemble (eponymous CD released in 2000 on the same Spool label). Wilson writes delicate pieces involving contrapuntal figures, jazz rhythm patterns, and rock-derived riffs. The music is mostly laid-back and atmospheric (think of Bill Frisell or Ben Monder). High-speed exceptions like "Lowest Note" do exist, making sure the listener doesn't settle in too comfortably. The album reaches a peak on the ten-minute "Untitled #4," a complex piece recalling Frank Zappa's Grand Wazoo phase where Wilson gets a guitar spotlight -- a rare event on this CD, since he usually limits his playing to discreet picking. Kevin Elaschuk (trumpet) and Dave Say (tenor sax) front the band's sound. Another highlight resides in the lyrical "Can't Take a Joke." Wilson's compositions are less repetitive than Lee and also tighter, but he does not take the Vancouver sound into new territories. All of which makes Lowest Note a strong but not surprising debut. read more...
  • Horse’s Dream

    Vancouver's Coastal Jazz and Blues hails him as "unquestionably one of the most original guitar stylists on the Canadian scene". Down Beat Magazine entitles him as "...a talismanic West Coast figure." On 'Horse's Dream', his first solo-based guitar recording, Tony Wilson taps into the history of jazz and blues with his compositions. They shift from Leadbelly’s moaning style to Metheny-like combustion. The other side of the album includes incomparable improvisation's that seem to be heading for an unknown target in an unknown land, a la John Fahey or Marc Ribot. Although Horse's Dream is solo-guitar based, it includes appearances by the odd fiddle, fireplace, spoon and kora. This unique album was recorded in a cabin at the Shire on Hornby Island. read more...
  • Escondido Dreams

    The Wilson/Lee/Bentley trio is a fully co-operative group formed by three veterans of the Vancouver creative music scene, Tony Wilson on guitar, Peggy Lee on cello and Jon Bentley on saxophones. Each musician has brought his/her compositional material to create Escondido Dreams and each performs a variety of functions within the group, from soloistic to accompaniment, melodic to colouristic and/or harmonic. This trio runs the gamut on their debut release from the more spacious and reflective episodes to their driving rhythms, soaring melodies and fierce improvisations in which they pack the punch of a large ensemble. read more...